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My #SciFund video is finally complete!

Quite a mission to do (first time), but I am happy with the finished product.

Click on the image:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a map showing the global distribution of participating scientists in Round 1 (2011) and Round 2 (May, 2012) of the #SciFund Challenge:

SciFunders Standing Tall and Talented

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Come tomorrow, my #SciFund project will go online with other projects in Round 2 of the #SciFund Challenge!
 
 
What is the #SciFund Challenge?
#SciFund Challenge is about raising funds for important and interesting science projects.
It’s called crowdfunding.
In 2011, Round 1 of the #SciFund Challenge raised over US$76,000 for science projects!
The participating scientists included students, professors and independent researchers.
 
How does it work?
Each participating scientist creates a project, and a fundraising target.
Next, each scientist promotes their project online through social media, personal blogs,
YouTube, #Scifund blogs and #Scifund website, from May 1 to May 31, 2012.
A big part of a crowdfunding campaign is a 2-3 minute video advertising the project.
I’ll wrap-up my video tomorrow, and post it on RocketHub (the online host of #SciFund Round 2).
Next, I’ll invite you all to have a look at my excellent project page on RocketHub.
Then, you can decide whether I have convinced you or not!
 
What is my #SciFund project?
It is my PhD project: ‘The face of pain’. Intrigued yet?
Some of the questions I am looking at are:
What differentiates pain faces from emotion faces?
What facial features communicate the most information in a pain face?
How do observers fixate on, react to, and interpret faces of pain?
These aren’t merely interesting questions.
There is potential for direct clinical application.
How? The more clearly we define the attributes that make pain a unique expression,
the better equipped we are to assess and manage pain in patients.
This is especially critical in patients who lack verbal expressions or language
(e.g., patients with verbal disorders, dementia, autism, neonates, infants).
Clinicians rely heavily on non-verbal expressions of pain (e.g., facial expression) in such cases.
 
What is my fundraising target?
My target is US$1000. 
This target is very achievable given a bit of work on my part during May,
and your outstanding generosity and vision!
This target will fund costs related to conducting my experiments online (it ain’t cheap!).
Oh, and did I mention there are rewards for donators?
I’m not kidding around.
I’ll reveal my rewards when my project is online tomorrow!
Now, if you don’t wish to support my project, that’s completely OK.
But, I do ask of you one small thing: spread the word about my #SciFund project 
through your social network.
How is that? 
Muchas gracias, mi buen amigo!
 
What happens next?
I will post the link to my project-page on Rocket Hub on this blog!
Thanks!

#SciFund Challenge Round 2 is days away!

What is #SciFund?

From the #SciFund website:

The #SciFund Challenge is a grand experiment in science funding. Can scientists raise money for their research by convincing the general public to open their wallets for small-amount donations? In more and more fields – from music to dance to journalism – people are raising lots of money for projects in precisely this way. The process is called crowdfunding. The first round of the #SciFund Challenge showed that this model can work for funding scientific research. Now, let’s take it to the next level!

My #SciFund project is: ‘The face of pain’

I am finishing my #SciFund Project video as we speak!

In the meantime, here is the project image:

What is religion? If this question asks what all religions have in common, then the answer is: next question, please.

What do all religions have in common? Nothing.

In contrast to Christianity, Islam and Judaism, Buddhism is atheistic with regard to a creator god. There is no doctrine of karma in Christianity. Hinduism is opulently polythesitic, but Islam is not. And so on.

In this kind of situation, it is more promising to offer a simile. What is religion like? Religion is like a cord composed of braided strands (e.g., a rope). The strands overlap and lie over each other in complex ways. The integrity of the cord does not consist in one strand, but in the arrangement of many strands.

Take any family. Look at the faces of its members. Do they have one facial feature in common?  No. There are both similarities (e.g., eye color), and differences (e.g., face contour). The relationships are complex, not simple. That is how it is. Just look and see for yourself.

Religion is extremely complex. To make a decent start at understanding it, good questions need to be asked. This is not easy. So, I urge looking first. What is observed? Compare your visual experiences. Look first, ask questions later.

I am too honest to be religious. Religion lains waste to honest reflection and questioning.

Many people claim to be religious. How many are pretenders?

There may be good reasons why a person pretends to be religious. A religious son adores his devout mother so much that he could not bare her to learn of his atheism. However, unknown to him and family, the mother is an atheist, and has been for decades. Like the son, she became a religious pretender in order to protect her mother’s feelings, and so on.

How to break this circle of lies? Honest reflection and questioning. And that takes great courage.

John Donne was partly right: A person is an island. But – every island is surrounded by water.

I am half myself, half you.

I am surrounded by your facial expressions. I adopt them as my own.

I cannot predict your every thought and action for the simple reason that most of my own thoughts and actions are completely spontaneous.

I cannot predict what I will do in most instances. I cannot know myself, so I cannot know you. True enough? We are both in the dark, it seems.

That sounds a bit bleak.

Is there any good news?

Yes: A person is not a vacuum. Human thought and action is shared. Shared, copied, modified, suppressed, distilled – we live in each other’s facial expressions.

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Simon van Rysewyk

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